The 20 Best Foods to Eat for Breakfast



The next time you rush out the door in the morning without something to eat, consider this: Skipping breakfast can set you up for overeating later in the day.




Oatmeal

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Via Health

You may have noticed a heart-shaped seal on your box of oatmeal recently. The seal's there because oats contain beta-glucan, a type of fiber that's been shown to help lower cholesterol when eaten regularly.


Whole-wheat bread

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Via Health

Carbohydrates are a breakfast mainstay, but the type of carbs you choose can make a big difference in the overall health of your meal.


Raspberries

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Via Health

These summer favorites are the main berry source of ellagitannins, a type of antioxidant that is thought to have cancer-fighting properties.


Cereal

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"Cereal can be tricky, because there are so many different kinds out there," Giovinazzo says. "Something with at least 5 grams of fiber and less than 5 grams of sugar is probably your best bet."


Cranberry juice

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Via Health

Cranberry juice, which helps limit bacterial growth, is best known for warding off urinary tract infections (UTIs), but its healing powers may not stop there.


Orange Juice

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Via Health

Fresh squeezed OJ is a classic (and tasty) morning beverage, but that doesn't mean it can't be improved on. For even more nutritional benefit, you'll want to opt for a store-bought variety that's fortified with vitamin D.


Kiwis

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This fuzzy little fruit has about 65 milligrams of vitamin C per serving—nearly as much as an orange.


Cantaloupe

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Any fruit is a good addition to your breakfast, Giovinazzo says, and cantaloupe is no exception.


Tea and more tea!

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Via Health

Not a coffee person? Tea has a pretty impressive résumé of health benefits, too.


Coffee

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Via Health

That espresso doesn't just wake you up. Coffee drinking has been linked to a lower risk of several diseases (such as diabetes and prostate cancer), and it may even help you live longer.


Strawberries

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"Berries are superfoods because they're so high in antioxidants without being high in calories,"


Blueberries

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Fresh or frozen, these tiny superfruits pack a big antioxidant punch. Or better yet, a flurry of punches.


Flaxseed

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Sprinkling ground flaxseed into a smoothie or bowl of cereal will turn your breakfast into a gold mine of omega-3 fatty acids; just two tablespoons contains more than 100% of your recommended daily intake.


Watermelon Sorbet

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As its name suggests, watermelon is an excellent way to hydrate in the morning.


Almond butter

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Via Health

Don't eat eggs or dairy? Almond butter is an excellent alternate source of protein, and it's filled with monounsaturated fat (one of the good fats).


Eggs!

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These incredible edibles have made quite a comeback in recent years. Once shunned for being high in dietary cholesterol (one yolk contains about 60% of your daily allotment), eggs are now embraced as a healthy source of protein and nutrients like vitamin D.


Bananas

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Via Health

There's nothing like a banana at breakfast to keep those mid-morning cravings at bay.


Grapefruit

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Trying to lose weight? According to one study, eating half a grapefruit before each meal may help you slim down faster, thanks to the fruit's fat-burning properties and its beneficial effect on blood sugar and insulin levels.


Wheat germ

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Via Health

A little wheat germ goes a long way. Just two tablespoons provides about 15% of your recommended daily intake of vitamin E and 10% of your daily folate.


Greek yogurt

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Via Health

This tangy, creamy yogurt is loaded with calcium and boasts plenty of protein—nearly twice as much as regular yogurt.